The Center for Citizenship and Social Responsibility, Medford MA Public Schools

 

The Center for Citizenship and Social Responsibility (CCSR), a district-wide afterschool program in Medford, MA, develops responsible global leaders/heroes who actively address social issues such as addiction, racism, depression, suicide, and bigotry.

 

Over the past four years, more than 2000 students have participated in mini-courses, clubs and activities, and most importantly community projects. The district-wide after school program is dedicated to making the community and the world a better place to live. At each school, there is a CCSR advisor, who guides students in the development of Project Based Learning activities, individually and in small groups of 2 or 3 students. The student(s) select a project that they believe will help others or make the community a better place to live. A full list and description of the projects can be found on our project page.

Vision and Mission:

Our public education system is the foundation of our democracy and the cauldron of the “melting pot”. We believe that public and private schools must incorporate social-emotional learning, empathy, compassion, and citizenship in school curricula to develop students leaders will who combat racism, bigotry, and hate. If we fail to do this, we miss an opportunity to have a profound impact on the kind of world in which our children will live.

We are living in a world that has many threats and challenges such as opioid deaths, hatred, prejudice, addiction, bullying, mass murders, climate catastrophes, gender bias, suicide, voting rights, gun control, global warming, pollution, poverty, etc. There are many government sponsored and private programs that attempt to deal with these issues.  Unfortunately, the vast majority of these programs address the symptoms and not the root cause. We believe that K-12 public school education provides us with the most effective place to address and reduce the effects of these issues. We strongly believe teaching children and adolescents how to be empathetic leaders and understand the plight of others is imperative to prevent such tragedies from happening again.

 

Goals

Character: We want our students to be able to act with integrity, respect, and responsibility

Citizenship: Our goal is to foster our students into being responsible citizens in a global society

Empathy: Our leaders learn to understand the plight of others and do something to help make the world a better place for all people

Service: The student-led projects are an outlet to allow the students themselves to become leaders and provide service to their communities

Leadership: Our students learn to be leaders in our community with the goal of making the world a better place to live.

 

History

Main Features of the CCSR Curriculum Model

Project Based Learning is a teaching method by which students gains knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to an authentic, engaging and complex question, problem, or challenge. Student projects are focused on student learning goals and include Essential Project Design Elements:

·       Key Knowledge, Understanding, and Success Skills - The project is focused on student learning goals, including standards-based content and skills such as critical thinking/problem solving, communication, collaboration, and self-management.

·       Challenging Problem or Question - The project is framed by a meaningful problem to solve or a question to answer, at the appropriate level of challenge.

·       Sustained Inquiry - Students engage in a rigorous, extended process of asking questions, finding resources, and applying information.

·       Authenticity - The project features real-world context, tasks and tools, quality standards, or impact – or speaks to students’ personal concerns, interests, and issues in their lives.

·       Student Voice & Choice - Students make some decisions about the project, including how they work and what they create.

·       Reflection - Students and teachers reflect on learning, the effectiveness of their inquiry and project activities, the quality of student work, obstacles and how to overcome them.

·       Critique & Revision - Students give, receive, and use feedback to improve their process and products.

·       Public Product - Students make their project work public by explaining, displaying and/or presenting it to people beyond the classroom

 

In PBL environments, students learn via a process of questioning, active learning, sharing, and reflection, thus making meaning of content (Blumenfeld et al., 1991). Students work together in groups developing skills such as collaboration, communication, and problem-solving. Classmates become coworkers and co-learners. “The learners are responsible for one another's learning as well as their own. Thus, the success of one learner helps other students to be successful.” Collaborative learning has been linked with higher achievement and productivity, more caring, supporting, and committed relationships, and greater psychological health, social competence, and self-esteem compared to working competitively (against others) or individualistically. Collaborative learning provides opportunities to increase social awareness as students work together to achieve a common goal. As conflict, disagreements, and setback occur, students learn to communicate and resolve social problems. Furthermore, students are able to see and understand differences between each other, build diversity, and create a positive learning atmosphere (Laal & Ghodsi, 2012).

 

Reflection is final design element of PBL and can encompass Social Emotional Learning (SEL). Reflection allows time for students to discuss everything from how things went, what could have made their work better, and each individuals contribution.  By asking group members to identify what behaviors help them work together and by asking individuals to reflect on their contribution to the group's success or failure, students are made aware of the need for healthy, positive, helping interactions (Panitz, 1996; Cohen. & Cohen, 1991 as cited in Laal & Ghodsi, 2012).

  

Social and emotional learning (SEL) is the process in which people understand and manage their emotions, set goals, have empathy, establish positive relationships, and make responsible choices SEL competencies are critical to education and can be naturally learned though Project Based Learning, (Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning, 2019).

 

The five core competencies of SEL are:

·       self-awareness

·       self-management,

·       social awareness

·       relationship skills

·       responsible decision making

Public education provides the most effective place to increase understanding, compassion, empathy and kindness in our society. Children develop their beliefs early in life and carry them with them to adulthood. For the most part, our schools have failed to include social-emotional learning (SEL) in traditional education. Since public education is the foundation of our democracy and the caldron of the melting pot, schools must incorporate social-emotional learning, empathy, compassion and citizenship. If we fail to do this, we miss an opportunity to have a profound impact on the kind of world that our children will live in.

 

By providing a nurturing environment and proper learning activities, educators can: prevent students from becoming addicted to harmful substances, committing suicide  while developing develop positive self-awareness, encouraging teamwork and cooperation, improving  self-esteem and developing leadership skills. We believe by incorporating real life experiences, authentic projects, for students we can will have a lasting positive effect on their self-image and understanding of others.

“The CCSR, which is headed by Richard Trotta, serves a vital need for Medford and is the kind of program that I would hope to see in every community. I have long advocated the importance of focusing on the social-emotional development of children and adolescents in our schools.  I have emphasized that such a focus is not an extra curriculum that diverts time from teaching academic subjects but rather creates an atmosphere in which students are not only more receptive to learning but also develop those skills that will enable them to be productive, responsible citizens throughout their lives. I know that one immediate goal of CCSR is to integrate social-emotional learning in the elementary schools, a goal I highly endorse.  I believe that if we are to educate the “whole” child and prepare children to meet the many challenges and responsibilities that await them, we must recognize that nurturing the social emotional intelligence of children is a vital ingredient in the educational process. It is my hope that CCSR receives the support it requires to remain true to its mission and to meet the important goals it has established.   Our children and their community will be the beneficiaries of such support.” Dr. Robert Brooks, Harvard Medical School and former Director of the Department of Psychology at McLean Hospital

Activities

Students

Since 2015, more than 2000 students have participated in program and have completed over 400 projects. In 2019-2020 over 500 students in grades K-12 are developing over 150 year-long community projects using the Project-Based Learning (PBL) methodology where students gain knowledge, learn to problem solve and develop leadership skills. Since PBL incorporates real life experiences for students, by working to help others, the learning has a lasting positive effect on their self-image, self-confidence, ability to empathize and understanding of others.

 

Students select their projects, which are chosen based on interest and passion! Most often, students work in groups of 2-3, but sometimes the groups are larger or individually based. And, at times, the project organizers recruit other students to carry out their activities.  Students meet a couple of times for organizational meetings, then twice a month as a whole group for general discussion and feedback.  They also meet with their advisors, who provide guidance.  Recognition is important. Students present their projects at a Project Fair; and the projects are also included in a CCSR Portfolio.

 

Speaker program Inspiration speakers are invited to address students on important issues: understanding other cultures, combating racism and hatred, addiction, etc. In the recent past, we have had:

                        

Examples of Student Projects  (For a complete list, go to www.medfordccsr.org)

 

High School Projects: Short Video of the high school program:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6j2J1icB9Mg

Plastic Bag Ordinance Update: Victory!  Last year, Medford’s city council unanimously supported a motion to draft a plastic bag ordinance. Rubia Fernandes. Fernandes started an online petition in her junior year, which has amassed over 600 supporters. After a year of working on this project, the ordinance has made significant progress, getting an official signature from Mayor Stephanie Muccini Burke on January 23rd. “I personally care about the environment a lot, and have taken notice of the actions that other communities took to reduce the amount of waste that they emit into the environment,” Fernandes said at the meeting. A summary of the Plastic Bag Ordinance and the discussion held at the City Council meeting can be found at Wicked Local. The council has confirmed they will take action to determine the details for implementation of a plastic bag ban ordinance, following suit of other cities, such as Cambridge and Melrose’s and their own plastic bag ordinances.

 

The ELL Give Back Program: A Nationally Recognized Program   Students from the Medford High School Center for Citizenship and Social Responsibility were surprised to hear they had won a national award from the KIND Foundation and Making Caring Common, a project of the Harvard Graduate School of Education, for a project welcoming English language learners. The students — Rubia Fernandes, Luiza Barbosa, and Jenna Agnone — created videos in seven different languages to help newcomers navigate the community, explaining things such as getting a bus pass and opening a locker. Each student received a $1,000 prize from the KIND Foundation.

 

Medford Slavery Memorial: Students Jenny Lu and Joseph Schmidt paired up with students Liam and Jasmine at the Brooks Elementary School in order to help them with their project, In Honor of Slaves. Many slaves were buried in the Salem Street Burying Ground without a proper grave marker to remember them by. The team put up a commemorative marker and held a memorial service for the forgotten slaves, during which poems were read to commemorate the slaves.

 

One Sapling at a Time: On Friday, December 7th 2018, sophomore CCSR students Caelee Bouley, Prabidhi Rana, Emily Gaddy, and Jenna Matarazzo; and sophomore Biology students Dorvelt Edouard, Henrique Ramos, Gabriela Papst Luiz, and Jose Avelar Serrano planted 10 Asian Pear trees, 10 blackberry bushes, and 10 raspberry bushes. The students planted 3 of the 10 trees and all 10 blackberry bushes. They are continuing the project by creating a simple, low-cost outdoor classroom space that teachers will be able to use to integrate the courtyard orchard and garden with their lessons. The classroom has Headmaster approval for a feasibility trial to start in May 2019Diversity Lesson Plan

 

Middle School Projects:

Single Pregnant Mothers  Students Danayara Torres and Brayan Solis wanted to help out the single, pregnant mothers within the Medford community. In partnership with the McGlynn Middle School Student Council, the two students held an event each day of Spirit Week. A theme was highlighted upon each day and participation cost $1. All money raised went towards helping single pregnant mothers within the Medford community.

 

In Honor of Slaves  Students Jenny Lu and Joseph Schmidt paired up with students Liam and Jasmine at the Brooks Elementary School in order to help them with their project, In Honor of Slaves. Many slaves were buried in the Salem Street Burying Ground without a proper grave marker to remember them by. The team put up a commemorative marker and held a memorial service for the forgotten slaves, during which poems were read to commemorate the slaves.

 

“Recycle, Trash, Compost” Sorting Game  Building upon the success of their book earlier in the year, this group of 5th-graders wanted to create a game to reinforce the recycling concepts taught in their book. Using only paper and markers, these girls created a sorting game for younger students to play during lunch. In this game, students sort the different objects into their appropriate bins: trash, recycling, compost, or electronics, as well as answering questions related to the topic. The group has been teaching 1st-graders how to play the game during lunch! Project done by Zahara Khan, Kathy Tang, Lina Alkurdi, Nadine Alkurdi, Teagan Altman

 

Elementary School Projects

Keep Warm Project by Angel Haung, Olivia Nelson, Kaylee Sanchez, Miranda Gomes, Oumniya Benalia, Maggie Fowler, Lilly Verhagen and Mary Schmidt  For the cold winter months, these CCSR members encouraged our entire school to donate new or gently worn coats, scarves and gloves with daily reminders on the morning announcements. The successful project resulted in 80+ coats, and 20+ hats and gloves that were collected and distributed to local homeless shelters. These opportunities gave us all a chance to reflect on being thankful for what we have and sharing with those less fortunate. 

 

Ethnic Pride Week Every year, the McGlynn Elementary School hosts an Ethnic Pride Week to teach children about the importance of their cultural background and learn to be accepting of others for their own cultures. This year, students Tia Belotte and Shruti Sood created a lesson plan centered around diversity and taught four classes of third graders during their week of ethnic pride. They played “diversity bingo” and had conservations with the students which taught them facts about countries around the world and learned about the cultures that can be found in the community as well.

 

3D Crosswalk  A third and fourth grader paired up to paint a 3D optical illusion crosswalk near the Brooks Elementary School.  The crosswalk painting would appear three dimensional.  The striped lines would look like floating blocks in the middle of the road.  The painted illusion has been successful at lowering speeds in many other locations.  The crosswalk is actually flat, but its stripes appear to an approaching driver to be more attentive. The Mayor loved the idea and scheduled them to speak at Traffic Commission meeting who gave them their support. This program went viral and was on national media outlet

 

Penny Wars: A Fundraiser: When it was decided that our CCSR club would have a fundraiser to help a McGlynn family that had become homeless as well as provide funding for different CCSR projects, these students took on the job of creating the flyer for families and the notification for students in classrooms. They worked hard on the computer designing a flyer that would include rules, be concise and be easy to read. Their information to students included easy to understand rules. Additionally, these students took a lead role in making sure the penny wars fundraiser was publicized in the school and run seamlessly. Project done by James Cluggish, Cooper Su, Grace Cluggish

 

Rememberance Marker for Enslaved People  Brooks School 3rd graders Liam Brady’s  and Jasmine Hagbourne’s project was to place a remembrance marker for enslaved people in the south west corner of the Salem Street Burying Ground Cemetery. This location has had over 50 slaves buried there without a marker for more than 200 years. In addition, they planned a city ceremony in June to reveal the new marker and pay tribute to these forgotten men and women.

 

            

Medford HS city summer cleanup        M.S.Buy A Bracelet, Save a Life     ElementSchool Animal Shelter Drive

 

Teacher Advisors

At each school in the Medford School District, there is a CCSR advisor/teacher who guides students in the development and implementation of social action and social justice projects. They receive stipends for the year.

 

The advisors are classroom based at each school, who have experience working on SEL or other related areas. The role of advisor is to mentor individual and small groups of students in planning and implementing their projects. The coordinator of the CCSR provides training and guidance to the advisors in using Project Based Learning and SEL.

2020 Update:

As Thanksgiving season approaches, we can all agree that there is so much to be thankful for! This November, the CCSR has designed a gratitude challenge, showing daily ways in which you can demonstrate gratitude.

Students, parents, staff, and community members are welcome to join us and show the world how the members of our wonderful community appreciate the amazing things that life has to offer! In order to participate, take a picture of yourself doing the following things and then post your pictures to our social media pages. The CCSR wishes everyone a very happy November! 

 

Audiences Served and Successful Impact

The CCSR serves all students in the school district in grades K-12. In the 2019-2020 school year there were 500 students participating in creating and implementing over 100 projects. Over the past five years, many of their projects have been recognized by local and national media. For example, The ELL Give Back Program: A The ELL Give Back Program: A Nationally Recognized Program   Students from the Medford High School Center for Citizenship and Social Responsibility were surprised to hear they had won a national award from the KIND Foundation and Making Caring Common, a project of the Harvard Graduate School of Education, for a project welcoming English language learners. The students — Rubia Fernandes, Luiza Barbosa, and Jenna Agnone — created videos in seven different languages to help newcomers navigate the community, explaining things such as getting a bus pass and opening a locker. Each student received a $1,000 prize from the KIND Foundation.

 

Nationally Recognized Program   Students from the Medford High School Center for Citizenship and Social Responsibility were surprised to hear they had won a national award from the KIND Foundation and Making Caring Common, a project of the Harvard Graduate School of Education, for a project welcoming English language learners. The students — Rubia Fernandes, Luiza Barbosa, and Jenna Agnone — created videos in seven different languages to help newcomers navigate the community, explaining things such as getting a bus pass and opening a locker. Each student received a $1,000 prize from the KIND Foundation.

 

Student Testimonials:

 “The CCSR has given me a gift of inspiration. I can mold and shape it into my own present for the world. I have become more aware of the community I have joined and want to help it progress. The things I have learned, the people I have met, and the experience I have gained will allow me to guide others. I am truly thankful for being a part of this amazing group.”Aniya Crump – CCSR Student Leader, Class of 2021

 

“The Center for Citizenship and Social Responsibility was and is a huge part of my high school experience. It’s hard to believe it’s been two years since I’ve joined, but the projects I’ve implemented, people I’ve worked with, and the changes I’ve seen are incredible to think about! I am so honored and Medford High School is so privileged to have this sort of initiative to make a change in the world! It means everything to me that I am able to give back to the community that has given so much to me!”Shubhecchha Dhaurali – CCSR Student Leader, Class of 2019

“From being in the CCSR for the past 3 years, I learned what it means to truly be a member of the community and what it means to be a good citizen. I learned that although times can be rough, you can always make things better if you look for the silver lining of things. The CCSR helped me grow emotionally by teaching me how to be sympathetic and caring for all. Prior to my entrance to the organization, I thought I had a general understanding of caring for my community, but upon entrance, I realized how much it meant and I find myself wanting to help more now than ever. In short, it feels humbling yet enabling to make the world a better place via the CCSR. I want to be able to do more for this organization, but at the same time it keeps you level headed and makes you realize how lucky you are to live in such a kind and accepting city with great opportunities like this. I’ll definitely miss my advisors of the CCSR and I’ll miss the friends I’ve made as a result of my projects. They all mean so much to me and I wouldn’t be here without them” Colin Bailey, CCSR Treasurer, Medford High School Junior, 17 Years Old

 

“The CCSR has meant the world to me over these past two years. Prior to joining there was an excessive amount of self-reflection of my life that felt more like self-punishment. I was ashamed to be someone who had nothing to show as their contribution to the world, a crushing feeling, even as a 15-year-old. When I was introduced to the CCSR I realized there was a path to improving the world that was not only accessible within my school, but also provided a sense of community which I craved. Over my time in my CCSR, I learned that I truly want to help the world and those in need. I learned that fighting for issues that are important to me provides an unmatched sense of emotional pride. I learned that I can make a difference now, not necessarily 10 years down the line. Through collaboration with other students, I learned that I am not alone. There are other students that share my passions for service and improvement. Emotionally, the CCSR has emphasized and improved what I have come to find as a crucial trait: empathy. You gain perspective in your service project by seeing what it is you’re improving, which leads to empathy in the struggles of others. An example is the Medford Slavery Memorial Project. By commemorating buried slaves in Medford with a marked gravestone memorial and having a celebratory ceremony, this CCSR project showed me the impact of slavery within our community and on black culture firsthand. I had a closer view of their struggles through poetry, speeches, and readings that, had it not been for the CCSR, I may not have experienced. What I’ll miss most about the CCSR is its reliability and community. Since the moment I joined, I knew this was a place where anyone is accepted with any idea. You don’t have to prove yourself to anyone; all you have to do is show that you care about making the world a better place. This fosters a community of hundreds of students with a basis of kindness and empathy, which is hard to find anywhere else. “Joey Ruemenapp - CCSR Co-President, Medford High School Junior, 17 Years Old

 

FacultyTestimonials:

“Working with the CCSR has been the most meaningful experience of my teaching career. I have the opportunity to work with students who are so passionate about helping others, giving back to the community and making the world a better place. They care deeply about our school, and are constantly thinking outside of the box as to how to make it better. As their advisor, I learn something from them every single day. It is an understatement to say that they have made me a better teacher, advisor, and a better person. I am inspired by the work of our CCSR Student Leaders, and I am so thankful to be a part of this incredible program. It makes me excited to go to school every day to know that we are truly making a difference.”Michael Skorker – Lead Teacher for SEL, Coordinator of the CCSR and MHS CCSR advisor

 

”The CCSR has changed the landscape of how young people can enact real change in our schools and in our community.  Under the leadership of the very dedicated Mr. Michael Skorker, these students have been empowered to make our world a better place.  The CCSR uses an ideal model for education:  students have a vested interest in their projects and therefore take full ownership and responsibility of the work.  When I attended the CCSR fairs during the 2017-2018 school year, I was so very impressed by the breadth and depth of the social issues that the CCSR students are addressing within the Medford community and beyond; mature and poised students spoke passionately to me about myriad issues to which they have dedicated hours of their time.  Because of the CCSR, young people at our elementary schools have a safe place to find a buddy, people in our community are more aware of issues of hunger and inequity in education, restorative justice models have begun to be put in place in Medford schools and churches, and that's just a small sample of the tremendous work they are doing.  The CCSR students are an inspiration to all members of the Medford High School community.  These young people are changing the world” David Ambrose, Teacher at Medford High School

 

School District Testimonials:

“CCSR has started a revival in the Medford Public Schools to revolutionize education and instill
a strong desire in all students to personally stretch themselves and go beyond thinking about
their own personal needs. I have had the opportunity to see the student’s excitement and
anticipation of working on individualized and group projects that will make a difference for the
voiceless and the boisterous in the world they live in. CCSR is comprised of a diverse group of
students who are multi-lingual, multi-ethnic and represent all walks of life who come together in
collaboration to make the world a better place. CCSR has provided my students with hope and
the belief that they can change the world…..and they will.”


“The Medford Public Schools can prepare them to lead productive and rewarding lives, whether
they pursue college or head right into a vocational or technical career. My goal has always been
to level the playing field for all students, as education is truly the key that opens the doors ofopportunity for us all.“CCSR empowers our students to look beyond themselves and see how they can help others. It reaches all students, no matter, race, creed, religion, or sexual orientation and offers them all a seat at the table”Dr. Marice Edouard-Vincent – Superintendent of Medford Public Schools

 

As schools are pushed to focus on academics many of the skills that students need to become emotionally strong productive citizens are ignored.  The CCSR program by focusing on these humanitarian skills brings this element of education back into the schools. I have witnessed the excitement of these students as they work on projects to help others and the community. The projects not only foster empathy for others but also build the social-emotional skills for students that are critically important as they enter adulthood. As an educator I have seen many projects brought into the school districts. I can honestly say that the CCSR initiative is one of the most worthwhile of all.    Beverly Nelson, Former Deputy Superintendent, Medford Public Schools

Community Testimonials:

As we describe the different student leader projects that we have learned about it caused Erin and I to reflect on all the wonderful work and impact on both the students and the greater community. Erin, Bonnie, Cameron along with the Campbell's are so excited to work with CCSR in the years to come. We are excited to see both the immediate and long term impact that our support can provide to providing students with increased opportunities to learn about leadership, diversity, social and global change! Elliot Nerland, Krystle Campbell Community Betterment Project, Team Leader

 

The Center For Citizenship and Social Responsibility is a much needed and a remarkable effort to get children involved in understanding and acting on important social issues they otherwise may not recognize or care about.  Not only will this have a positive impact on the world around us but it will at the same time help raise the level of self-confidence and self-esteem of thousands of children which truly is the foundation by which anyone can achieve and accomplish anything in their lives. Dave McGillivray, President, DMSE Sports, race director, philanthropist, speaker

 

The Center for Citizenship and Social Responsibility (CCSR) has been beneficial for the Medford Public Schools (district-wide). Not only are students gaining a great learning experience, but the program has been an asset for individuals as well as organizations. The CCSR program has a truly positive impact on our community, through student’s creativity and collaborative research; they are an example of social change. It has been wonderful to see projects come to fruition over the past few years and I look forward to another year of success for the CCSR program! Stephanie Muccini Burke, Mayor of Medford Massachusetts

Recommendations for Replication and/or Adaptation

We believe that all schools must incorporate social-emotional learning, empathy, compassion and citizenship in school curricula to develop students leaders, will who combat racism, bigotry and hate. If we fail to do this, we miss an opportunity to have a profound impact on the kind of world that our children will live in.”  By providing a nurturing environment and  proper learning activities, we can: prevent students from becoming addicted to harmful substances, committing suicide  while developing develop positive self-awareness, encouraging teamwork and cooperation, improving  self-esteem and developing leadership skills. Our belief is that incorporating real life experiences and authentic projects for students to  help others will have a lasting positive effect on their self-image and understanding of others.

 

Sharing our work with others while recognizing our students for their efforts is an important component of our program. We have created the CCSR website, www.medfordccsr.org, a Blog, a Facebook page, and an Instagram account. In addition, we contact school administrators and other stakeholders from school districts to inform them of the effectiveness and power of the CCSR.

Why school districts should implement the CCSR

Ø  afterschool program – does not impact classroom academics

Ø  provides a supervisor/coordinator and mentor teachers

Ø  utilizes Project-Based Learning

Ø  integrates civic education with classroom instruction

Ø  students create authentic community service projects which improve the school, community and world

Ø  cost effective program 

Ø  students learn: empathy – compassion – leadership – teamwork- problem solving - communication skills

Ø  emotional benefits: self-confidence – hope - belonging  self-satisfaction - intrinsic gratification

 

School systems have inquired about our program, and we are happy to share. Please visit our web page to learn more about the CCSR and to see the great work that our students are doing in the community to make the world a better place. If anyone is interested in creating a CCSR in your school or community please see “Contact.”

 

Contact

Richard Trotta, Director of the Center for Citizenship and Social Responsibility

Medford, MA Public Schools

489 Winthrop Street

Medford Massachusetts
 

rtrotta@medford.k12.ma.us  

781-953-4750